Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 8th International Conference on Animal Health & Veterinary Medicine Toronto, Canada (Park Inn by Radisson Toronto Airport West, ON).

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Claire Andreasen

Iowa State University, USA

Keynote: One health- The time is now
OMICS International Animal Health 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Claire Andreasen photo
Biography:

Claire Andreasen is a Professor and Director of One Health at Iowa State University (ISU) College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM). She has worked with Centers of Excellence at Iowa State, Kansas State and Texas A&M Universities, with funding for emerging and transboundary animal disease education, pathology, and secure food continuity. She has a DVM from Texas A&M, she was in clinical practice, completed a pathology residency and PhD from the University of Georgia and obtained board certification. She was on the faculty at Oregon State University before coming to the ISU CVM. She was previously a Department Chair and then Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs. She has received university awards in teaching, research and departmental leadership.

Abstract:

The Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine has a long history of engagement in One Health. The veterinary profession and related health professions interact with both people and animals; therefore, providing a critical intersection of health and wellness information, especially in the areas of zoonotic and infectious diseases, and safe animal-sourced food products. The American Veterinary Medical Association One Health initiative states that: One Health is the integrative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to attain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment. One Health is also reflected in our college mission statement: The Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine is dedicated to the enhancement of the health and well-being of animals and human beings through excellence in education, research, professional practice and committed service to the State of Iowa, the nation and the world. It is a critical time to support one health in our missions of education, research, professional practice, and outreach, since a collaborative team approach with various experts is needed to solve global problems that impact public health.

OMICS International Animal Health 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kyle Schachtschneider photo
Biography:

Kyle Schachtschneider, PhD, graduated with a Bachelor’s in Animal Sciences from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2008, and received his PhD in Animal Sciences from the same institution in 2013. Following the completion of his Doctoral training, he worked as a Post-doctoral Researcher at the Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre at Wageningen University, the Netherlands performing next generation sequencing analysis to investigate genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptomic variation associated with healthy and disease states in porcine biomedical models. Following his time overseas, he joined the Department of Radiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago to develop epigenetic and bioinformatics-based projects to compliment the clinically focused research efforts of the department. He is currently utilizing multi-omics datasets to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumor biology and the impact of the tumor microenvironment on clinically relevant phenotypes in both preclinical and clinical settings.

Abstract:

Despite an improved understanding of cancer molecular biology, immune landscapes, and advancements in cytotoxic, biologic, and immunologic anti-cancer therapeutics, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. The development and investigation of new diagnostic modalities and innovative therapeutic tools is critical for reducing the global cancer burden. Towards this end, transitional animal models serve a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental diagnostic and therapeutic discoveries and human clinical trials. Such animal models offer insights into all aspects of the basic science-clinical translational cancer research continuum (screening, detection, oncogenesis, tumor biology, immunogenicity, therapeutics, and outcomes). To date, however, cancer research progress has been markedly hampered by lack of a genotypically, anatomically, and physiologically relevant large animal model. Our group developed a transgenic porcine model - the oncopig cancer model (OCM) - as a next generation large animal platform for addressing unmet clinical needs. The OCM recapitulates transcriptional hallmarks of human disease while also exhibiting clinically relevant histologic and genotypic tumor phenotypes. Moreover, as the global population becomes increasingly unhealthy, cancer patients commonly present clinically with multiple comorbid conditions. Due to the effects of these comorbidities on patient management, therapeutic strategies, and clinical outcomes, an ideal animal model should develop cancer on the background of representative comorbid conditions (tumor macro and microenvironments). The OCM has the capacity to develop tumors in combination with such relevant comorbidities. Furthermore, studies on the tumor microenvironment demonstrate similarities between OCM and human cancer genomic landscapes.

Keynote Forum

Yusuf L Henuk

Sumatera Utara University, Indonesia

Keynote: Mealworm: A promising alternative protein source for animal nutrition
OMICS International Animal Health 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yusuf L Henuk photo
Biography:

Yusuf L Henuk is a Professor in the Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture at University of Sumatera Utara (USU), Medan, North Sumatera, Indonesia. He received a Bachelor’s degree from the Faculty of Animal Science, the University of Nusa Cendana from 1980-1984. He obtained Master’s in Rural Science (M.Rur.Sc.) from the University of New England 1991 – 1995 and continued Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) from the University of Queensland 1998 – 2001. He was a Visiting Professor to the Department of Poultry Science, Texas A&M University, USA (September – December 2010 & 2017). He was a prolific writer and has published many articles in international journal and mainly poultry science.

Abstract:

Global food production system is facing challenges to meet the growing demand for quality animal products due to rising incomes, urbanisation, environment and nutritional concerns and other anthropogenic pressures. As the world population rises, the global food system faces an impending crisis and a major component of this crisis is the forecast that the livestock sector is growing at a rate that is deemed unsustainable. Insect consumption by humans has always been a worldwide practice. The practice of eating these six-legged creatures known as insects is called entomophagy, which is derived from the word “ento-”, meaning insect, and “-phagy,” meaning to eat. Insects are already used as food to sustain millions of people around the world, and have been for centuries. This food habit dates back to prehistory and is still traditional in many countries especially where food is in short supply but also where food security is not a major concern. 11 countries around the world had established commercial insect harvesting operations in the wild, from Australia to Vietnam, India, and beyond. In Europe and the US, we have been slower to catch on to this growing trend. But in recent years, budding entrepreneurs have heard the buzz and pioneered a suite of new technologies and methodologies to allow sustainable production of insects. Nutrition value of mealworm has been used as a protein source for domestic animals and even further for human consumption. Therefore, we must look to alternative sources of protein that can be produced on a viable and sustainable commercial scale, and in recent years edible insects have been proposed as one potential ‘new’ protein source for animals. The main reason for this is that many insects can be farmed at relatively low economic and environmental costs; farming insects use up to 50–90% less land per kg protein, 40–80% less feed per kg edible weight and produces 1000–2700 g less GHGEs (Greenhouse gas emissions) per kg mass gain than conventional livestock. Insects at all life stages are rich sources of animal protein. Until now, the main research efforts have focussed on the larvae of the Black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens), the maggot and pupae of the housefly (Musca domestica), the larvae of the mealworm (Tenebrio molitor), and insect families belonging to the order Orthoptera including locusts, grasshoppers, crickets and katylids. However, insects of the order Blattodea, like American, German, and Asian cockroach are also interesting candidates. A 2014 review by FAO scientists of feeding trials conducted on catfish, tilapia, rainbow trout, and several other fish species, as well as crustaceans, chickens, and pigs, concluded that insect meal could replace between 25% and 100% of soymeal or fishmeal in the animals’ diets with no adverse effects. The nutritional profile of mealworms is comparable to other protein sources currently used in poultry feeds, especially fishmeal. On a dry matter basis, mealworms contain 44-69% protein, 23-47% fat than fishmeal contain 61-77% protein, 11-17% fat. Currently, mealworm are known in Indonesia as “ulat hong kong” which has been used widely as feed for pigs, poultry and fish.

OMICS International Animal Health 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Paa Kobina Turkson photo
Biography:

Paa Kobina Turkson is a Professor of Veterinary Epidemiology. He is a Veterinarian by profession and a Veterinary Epidemiologist by specialization. He obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine (1983) and an MSc in Veterinary Public Health (1986) from the University of Nairobi, Kenya, and a PhD in Epidemiology from the College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh USA in 1998. He is currently the Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ghana.

Abstract:

Antimicobials have been and are being used extensively in animal health and production to treat and/or prevent infections or diseases and as probiotics or antibiotic growth promoters. Most of these antimicrobials are similar in structure or formulary to those used for treatment of certain human infections or diseases. Indiscriminate, improper or irrational use of antimicrobials in agriculture, especially in animal health, have been recognised as a source or sources of exposure to antimicrobial and antimicrobial residues and a contributory factor to the emergence or persistence of antimicrobial resistance in certain bacteria causing infections in humans. This paper reviews information on antimicrobial use and antimicrobial resistance in animal health and production in Ghana, discusses the implications of these findings to human health and sets out recommendations to mitigate the situation.

  • Oral Session 1
Location:
Speaker

Chair

Claire Andreasen

Iowa State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Kyle Schachtschneider

University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

Session Introduction

Laura Nathwani

University of Manchester, UK

Title: A systematic review of current antimicrobial usage in global aquaculture
Speaker
Biography:

Laura Nathwani graduated from The Royal Veterinary College in 2005 with a degree in veterinary medicine and biological sciences. She has completed 8 years in small animal practice both in private practice and working for a small animal veterinary charity. In 2013 she undertook a Masters in Global Health at The University of Manchester where she completed her dissertation on the usage of antimicrobials in aquaculture.

Abstract:

Aquaculture is currently the fastest growing agricultural sector due to increased global demand for high quality protein with most growth in Asia, particularly China. It is also one of the most intensive farming practices and is as such susceptible to antimicrobial overuse. There are concerns that antimicrobial stewardship in these emerging economies is at best unknown and at worst insufficiently regulated and the risk is that antimicrobial usage may keep pace with aquaculture expansion. If this is the case, the impacts are huge. There is a growing body of evidence linking antimicrobial usage in aquaculture, through a complex web of other aquatic species and the environment, to antimicrobial resistance in people. Given the already substantial rates of infectious disease globally, especially in countries that can least afford them, adding an increase in antimicrobial resistance could result in a humanitarian crisis. The objective of this review was to collect and analyze the most current data on antimicrobial usage in global aquaculture. A comprehensive literature search was used to identify all countries where sufficient quantitative data was available, followed up by more country specific searches to locate the primary data or review. All available information about their antimicrobial usage in aquaculture was extracted and the data was compiled into a table. It was only possible to do descriptive comparisons between most countries as the data collected was of unproven validity and reliability and was neither collected using similar methods nor presented in a consistent format that would have allowed trends to be analyzed or comparisons or generalizations made. It was found that information on the methodologies used for data collection and analysis is severely lacking in the scientific literature. It also highlighted the dearth of countries that collect accurate antimicrobial sales data in aquaculture or monitor end-point usage. It is vital to ensure antimicrobial stewardship practices, are responsible now, before any potential problems burgeon. To do this a benchmark of current antimicrobial use is needed to inform priorities that need to be urgently addressed and to allow measurement of the impact of future programs. This is a preliminary report of baseline data which may be used by animal health industries to develop and measure success in, approaches to maximize the life of antimicrobials for animal health and welfare.

Speaker
Biography:

Asem M Atwa has completed his PhD in Veterinary Microbiology. He invented a patent vaccine for poultry necrotic enteritis. He worked as Laboratory Director at veterinary quarantine. Now, he is working as Researcher at Animal Medical Center.

Abstract:

Objective: Studying the clinical efficacy of intra-articular and intravenous injection of LED activated ADMSC in improving the comfort and mobility of dogs with hip OA.
Design: Each case selected were previously scheduled for excision arthroplasty surgery, however the owners were more inclined to consider a less invasive method in managing the pain and lameness. LED activated ADMSC was offered as an alternative.
Case Description: Clinical report applied on a random selection of 8 dogs of different age and breed diagnosed with coxofemoral OA.
Clinical Finding: Pain, lameness and limited range of motion were present in all cases. 2 cases had signs of muscle atrophy, joint laxity and osteoarthritis. The remaining 6 cases had signs of hip osteoarthritis and muscle atrophy only with OAS scores ranging from Grade 2 to Grade 5.
Outcomes: The pain, lameness and mobility were assessed using osteoarthritis scores (OAS), orthopedic evaluation score chart (OES) and distraction index (DI) techniques. These evaluations were applied at pretreatment, 1, 2, 3, 12 and 24 months post-treatment. All cases in this study showed clinical improvement 30 days after LED activated ADMSC administration. The mean value of OES, DI and OAS showed significantly improved up to 12 months. However, no clinical improvements or changes in mobility or pain scores were shown for the next 12 months.
Clinical Relevance: All cases showed obvious clinical improvements for a period up to 1-year post-therapy. Improvements were noted on the OES scores through reduced pain and stiffness and improved mobility and activity.

Speaker
Biography:

F Laabassi has been working as a Senior Lecturer at the University of Batna, Algeria.

Abstract:

Introduction: Equine herpes viruses belong to the family Herpesviridae. To date, five herpesviruses have been described as pathogenic and responsible for multiple clinical manifestations in horses: Equine herpes virus 1 (EHV1: equine abortion virus), Equine herpes virus 3 (EHV3: equine coital exanthema virus) Equine herpes virus 4 (EHV4: Equine rhinopneumonia virus), belonging to the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, and Equine herpes virus 2 (EHV2) and Equine herpes virus 5 (EHV5) both belonging to the subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential rule of equine herpesviruses during an episode of acute equine respiratory infection reported in the beginning of 2011 in Tiaret (West province of Algeria).
Materials & Methods: 100 nasal swabs (NS) were collected from horses aged between 1 to 27 years, presenting with cough and mucopurulent nasal discharge) between February and March 2011. These NS were all analyzed for the presence of Equine herpes viruses (EHV1, EHV2, EHV4 and EHV5) by quantitative PCR methods (qPCR). Two other equine respiratory viruses, equine influenza virus (EIV) and equine viral arteritis virus (EAV) were also investigated. Each PCR targeted a virus-specific conserved genome: The glycoprotein B coding sequence for EHVs 1, 2, 4 and 5, the matrix protein (M1) for EIV and the nucleoprotein (N) for EAV.
Results: One, or more, of four equine respiratory viruses were detected concomitantly in the nasal swabs of 90 of 100 horses (90%) and the detection rate of Equine herpes viruses type 1 (EHV-1), Equine herpes virus type 4 (EHV-4), Equine herpes virus type 2 (EHV- 2) and Equine herpes virus type 5 (EHV-5) were 2%, 14%, 90% and 75%, respectively. Equine influenza virus and equine arteritis virus were not detected in any samples. Among the 90 infected horses, 70 were co-infected with EHV-2 and EHV-5 and 14 others were co-infected with EHV-4, EHV-2 and EHV-5. The present study shows a positivity rate of 97.3% for EHV-5 in young horses aged <3 years, a finding which decreased with age. Viral load of EHV-5 was significantly higher in <3 years whereas no effect of age was observed with EHV-2.
Conclusion & Discussion: The present study demonstrates that equine respiratory viruses (EHV-1, -4, -2 and -5), are present in horses in Algeria. This study shows the first detection of equine respiratory viral infection and the first quantification of EHV-2 and EHV-5 genomes in equine respiratory fluids by a qPCR tests within Algeria.

Speaker
Biography:

Khan MA Samad has completed his PhD from the University of Aberdeen, UK and Post-doctoral studies from the University of Paderboron, Soest, Germany. Presently, he is the Professor of Dairy Cattle Production, Department of Dairy Science at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh. His special interest is on feed supplementation for milk production and reproduction in milking animals. He has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals of both national and international and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute. Moreover, he is the Member of many scientific societies of the world.

Abstract:

In smallholder production system, a major constraint to milk production is the seasonality forced on cow by inadequate feeding during dry season in Bangladesh. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a cost effective supplementary feeding system for poor quality roughage based cattle production. Urea molasses block (UMB) supplementation may be a technology to solve the nutritional inadequacy. 60 crossbred (Holstein Friesian x zebu) lactating cows of 31 smallholder farms were studied to evaluate the effectiveness of UMB during dry (November to April) and rainy season (May to October). Cows were stall-fed and reared mainly on rice straw. Cows of one group received basal diet kept as control (-UMB) and another group received UMB as supplemented group (+UMB) in both seasons. Intake of straw was increased significantly (p<0.05) in supplemented cows of both in dry and rainy season as 1.2 and 0.77 kg/day, respectively. Other nutrients - DM, CP, ME intake was also increased. It was found that milk production in supplemented cows maintained higher magnitude as 1.54 kg/d and 0.73 kg/d in both dry and rainy seasons, respectively. Higher body weight gain of cows was found in dry season (135 g/d) than in rainy season (50 g/d). Similarly, weight gain of calves of supplemented cows was increased significantly (p<0.01). Interval from calving to first estrus was reduced by 31 (166 vs. 135) and 19 (157 vs. 138) days in dry and rainy season, respectively (p>0.05). This result indicates that UMB supplementation is more beneficial to the farmers in dry season.

Speaker
Biography:

Hasan Kermanshahi has completed PhD in Saskatchewan University, Canada and has been working as a Professor for more than 20 years in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. He has published more than 115 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

One of the most important mycotoxins which are produced by toxigenic strains of different Aspergillus spp. is aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). The aim of this 3-wk study was to evaluate the ability of sodium bentonite (NaB), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Lactobasillus rhamnosus strain GG (LAB) to alleviate the deleterious effects of AFB1 on intestinal morphology in broiler chicks. 321 day old as hatched broilers (Ross 308) were maintained in the cage litter and allowed ad libitum access to feed and water. A completely randomized design was used with 5 replicate pens of 8 chicks assigned to each of 8 dietary treatments from hatch to 21 days. Dietary treatments included: basal diet (BD) with no AFB1 or any binder, contaminated diet (CD) with AFB1 (2 mg/kg of feed), 3, 4, BD supplemented with NaB (0.5%), yeast and LAB 6, 7, CD supplemented with NaB (0.5%), yeast and LAB. Morphological characteristics were measured at different segments of intestinal lumen. AFB1 decreased the villus height (700.05) in jejunum and villus height (2.71) to crypt depth ratio (3.68) in jejunum and ilium in comparison with control (P<0.05). However, addition of three binders could partially increase these features. In conclusion, it is suggested by this study that in feed contaminated with AFB1, the use of sodium bentonite, yeast and LAB is an efficient strategy to reduce the adverse effects of aflatoxicosis in broiler chicks.

Speaker
Biography:

R T Kridli has completed his PhD from New Mexico State University. He has been a faculty member at the Dept. of Animal Production, Jordan University of Science and Technology since 1996. He has spent 5 years at the Dept. of Biomedical Sciences, University of Guelph as a Visiting Scholar and later as a Research Associate. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals mainly in the area of animal reproduction.

Abstract:

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) supplementation on growth, ovarian weight and blood metabolites of pre-pubertal female rats. 24 Sprague Dawley rats were used in the present study. Rats were 25 days of age and weighed 45.6±5 g at the beginning of the study. Two rats were placed in each cage in a temperature-controlled room and offered feed on ad libitum basis. Rats were randomly divided into three equal groups (n=8); control (CON, no ginger), 50 mg ginger/kg of body weight (G50) and 100 mg ginger/kg of body weight (G100). After adaptation, the CON group received distilled water, while the experimental groups received the designated ginger dose (gavage) daily for 30 days. All animals were sacrificed at the end of the 30-day period for blood (cardiac puncture) and reproductive tract collection. Body weight and size were affected by date of collection (P<0.01) but not by ginger supplementation. Body weight change was numerically greater in the G50 group. Blood glucose and urea nitrogen were similar among groups while cholesterol tended to decrease (P<0.10) as the ginger dosage increased. Weight of the right ovaries were similar while the G100 had smaller (P<0.05) left ovaries than the remaining groups. Reproductive tract weights tended to be greater (P=0.10) in the G50 than in the CON group while the G100 group was intermediate. Results of the present study indicate that ginger administration to pre-pubertal female rats tends to decrease serum cholesterol, with higher doses negatively affecting ovarian development.

Speaker
Biography:

Selvinaz Yakan is an expert in Veterinary Surgery. She has completed her PhD at Kafkas University, and currently working as Associate Professor at Agri Ibrahim Cecen University of Eleskirt Celal Oruc School of Animal Production, Animal Health Department, Ağrı, Turkey. She focuses on pain, veterinary ophthalmology, wound healing, veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia.

Abstract:

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of Hypericum perforatum (HP) and Nigella sativa (NS) which are antioxidant and tissue protective with the biochemical and histopathological changes in experimental ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) damage in rat testis tissue. The research was carried out on 30 adult male Wistar albino rats. Rats were randomly separated into 3 main groups, each group consisted of 10 animals. Control group (torsion but no topical agent) with HP and NS groups applied 25 mg/kg HP and NS intraperitoneally 30 minutes before torsion. In all the groups torsion was created by rotating only left testis at an angle of 720 degrees clockwise for 2 hours. Torsion was maintained by fixing the left testis in the scrotum with a 4-0 silk suture and then the incision was closed. Following 2 hours torsion the left testis detorsion and replaced in the scrotum for 4 hours. At the end of the experiment, the left testis removed for measurement of markers of oxidative stress and histopathological examination. In the HP and NS groups, malondialdeyhde (MDA) concentration was significantly lower, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly higher than control group. Both HP and NS have protective against I/R damage of the left testis, but the protective effects of NS was found to be higher than that of HP.

Speaker
Biography:

Mian A Hafeez has completed his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM), MPhil and his PhD from University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan. He did his Post-doctoral studies from University of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College, Canada and continued working for seven years as Diagnostic Molecular Parasitologist. Currently, he is working as Associate Professor (visiting, on leave from Ontario Veterinary College) in University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan. He has published more than 35 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

The complete mitochondrial genome of Isospora amphiboluri and Isospora sp. n. (Eimeriidae, Coccidia, Apicomplexa) were sequenced. These coccidia infect the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps (Sauria: Agamidae) and black throated laughing thrush Garrulax chinensis (Aves: Passeriformes) respectively. PCR was performed post DNA extraction and protein estimation by Nanodrop. The Whole Genome was achieved in fragments and assembled. Genome organization and gene content was conventional. The circular-mapping mt genome of Isospora amphiboluri is 6264bp and Isospora sp. n. 6158bp in length consisting of 3 protein coding genes (cox1, cox3 and cytb), 19 gene fragments encoding large subunit (LSU) rRNA and 14 gene fragments encoding small subunit (SSU) rRNA. Like other Apicomplexan, no tRNA was encoded. The comparable mitochondrial genome sequences and structures of Isospora and Eimeria species confirm the close relationship between these eimeriid genera of apicomplexan parasites. Investigation of Eimeria genes intricate the basic biology and host-parasite interaction and highlights adaptations to a comparatively simple developmental life cycle. The purpose of this study was to sequence and annotate the complete mitochondrial genomes of Isospora amphiboluri and Isospora sp. n that commonly infect bearded dragon and black throated laughing thrush.

Speaker
Biography:

Nadine Al-Jumaa is a veterinarian working as a supervisor and a mentor at the Major Iraqi Poultry Projects Department- the Ministry of Agriculture of Iraq. She has completed her master’s degree in Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry from College of Veterinary Medicine-University of Baghdad in 2015. She has completed the bachelor degree in Veterinary Medicine and Surgery in 2009 from College of Veterinary Medicine- University of Baghdad too. Her Masters project was about anti-diabetic medicine, and she is willing to do more researches related with the humans-animals health in the future.

Abstract:

This study was designed to evaluate the hypolipidemic effect of sitagliptin in Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/fructose exposed male rabbits. Twenty one (21) adult male rabbits were randomly and equally divided into three groups (T1, T2 and T3) and were treated for 45 days as follows: Group T1 (Control group), rabbits in groups T2 and T3 were given 40% fructose -1% H2O2 in drinking water. In addition to fructose and H2O2, 1.5 mg/kg B.W of sitagliptin were administered orally to rabbits in group (T3). Fasting (8-12 hrs) blood samples were collected by heart puncture technique at 0, 45 days of the experiment for measuring total cholesterol (TC), Triacylglycerol (TAG) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) concentration. In addition, body weight and waist circumference was measured weekly as marker for central obesity. The results revealed that exposure of rabbits to 40% fructose -1% H2O2 in drinking water (T2 group) caused a case of dyslipidemia manifested by a significant elevation in serum (TC), (TAG), (LDL-C) and (VLDL-C) concentration in addition to depression (HDL-C) concentration and a significant elevation in body weight and waist circumference. Hypolipidemic effect of sitagliptin, was clarified in group (T3), and manifested by restoring of previous parameters leading to correction in the case of dyslipidemia, body weight and central obesity. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm the ameliorative role of Sitagliptin against deleterious effect of fructose/ H2O2 in adult male rabbits.

Speaker
Biography:

Luansha Hu has received her Bachelor's degree from South China Agricultural University and is studying for a Master's degree at Zhejiang University. She is majoring in Animal Nutrition and Feed Science.

Abstract:

There are enormous amount of microbes in the gut of animal. When the intestine got affected by the change of gut microbiota diversity and balance, the whole body system can get affected. Diseases caused by imbalance of intestinal microbiota can be treated by treatments involving microbiota, such as probiotics, prebiotics, symbiotic and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). This study was conducted to investigate the effect of intervarietal FMT on recipient piglets. Twelve litters of Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire (DLY) piglets of the same birth and parity were weighed and divided into two groups. One group (recipient piglets) were oral inoculated with suspension daily from 1 to 11 days, the other (control) were given orally to the same volume of sterile physiological saline, the feeding trial lasted 27 days. The results showed that recipient piglets had higher relative abundance of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria than control. Compared with control, relative abundance of Ruminococcus, Prevotella, Oscillospira, Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae in recipient piglets were increased. Compared with control, Sutterella, Escherichia, Bacteroides, Fusobacteriaceae, Clostridiaceae, Pasteuriaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Bacteroidaceae and Veillonellaceae were lower. FMT decreased diarrhea incidence of recipient piglets during the experiment. The ratio of villus height to crypt depth in small intestine of the FMT was increased. FMT increased the optical density of sIgA+ cell in the colon of FMT. The number of goblet cells in the ileum and colon of recipient piglets were also increased compared with control. The expression of MUC2 in ileum and colon of recipient piglets were higher than control. Compared with control, TLR2 and TLR4 receptors in the colon mucosa of recipient piglets were increased. The expressions of β-defensin 2 in ileum of recipient piglets were higher than control. These results indicated that FMT can not only change the structure of intestinal microbiota of the recipient, but also promote the development of intestinal mucosa, and thus enhance resistance to disease of recipient, thereby promoting the growth performance of the recipient piglets.